Itadakimasu! @Miyuki

“Something happens when you stay at a DoubleTree by Hilton”. And a lot happens at Miyuki too, the exclusive Japanese restaurant at their Chinchwad property.

The hotel is situated on Tata Motors road, close to major manufacturing companies provides luxury suites, award-winning restaurants and different amenities under one roof. The interiors are tasteful  and do justice with the Hilton tag. The hospitality of the staff will make you feel special.

The Hotel have four restaurants serving delectable continental, Indian and Japanese cuisines. I was invited by Mitali, PR – Goodwordmedia to taste the new menu at Miyuki and this was the first’s for me to taste the authentic Japanese food.

The setting of restaurant speaks to you

With place for only seven, you can feel the exclusivity. The chairs face hibachi grill which makes you see the chef in action. The Japanese food is all about minimalism and you can see that in the whole concept.

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The new Menu:

Japanese cuisine is more than just Sushi, Sashimi or Teppanyaki. The food is an art in Japan & it reflects in all dishes. Japanese cuisine mainly consists of rice, fish, ramen, pickled vegetables & seasonal ingredients. The new menu is designed around these components keeping the original flavour alive. They also have bento (lunch box) concept which is like a fixed meal.

The Chef:                                             

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Chef Amarjeet

 

Chef Amarjeet is the man behind Asian Cuisine & Miyuki is trained by Master chefs from Japan. Being exclusive restaurant has its own charms and chef accompanies you throughout the meal. He welcomes you with Konnichiwa & a big smile. The chef is very friendly and tells you the story behind Sushi, the origin of Ramen & some interesting Japanese food facts…

The Tasting:

The lunch started with Ume Okra Yakko which is chilled tofu served with pickled plum & ladyfingers. Tofu with silken texture was super soft and as per chef, was imported. The crunch from Okra, sweetness from soy sauce & sourness from pickled plum creates flavour   riot in the mouth.

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Ume Okra Yakko

Next was Sashimi platter with Salmon, Swordfish & Tuna. The presentation was beautiful, the cuts were even more. I never had a swordfish and chef advised to mix wasabi with soy sauce. The idea is that wasabi has anti bacterial properties and if you don’t know the fish will suit you, just dip it in the mixture. Wasabi cleanse the raw fish & soy will reduce the pungent taste off wasabi. I loved the mild & sweet flavour of swordfish & the texture is meaty even though it’s a fish, a must try.

Yakitori: Tori Negima (Chicken & Scallions) & Ebi (Shrimps)

Yakitori is simply chicken grilled on skewers. The chef will prepare the dish on the grill in front of you and the whole act is an art. Its like some sword fight ending in a delicious grilled chicken seasoned with yakitori sauce. Another lip smacking preparation. Yumm

Suigyo No Yakiniku is grilled tenderloin in Yakiniku sauce. The presentation of the dish is beautiful, meat tender and taste was inbetween sweet & savoury. Its something I would love to eat as an appetizer.

Ebi Furai or crumb fried prawns is a perfect companion of Beer and it is served with Japanese Tartar sauce, toatally different from the regular one. Chef told us that it has been made with egg yolks, onions, gherkins, mayonnaise & parsley.

We are having Japanese food and Ramen is an integral part of the Japanese cuisine. We were served with Suimono, a clear broth soup with Miso ramen. The broth was very rich in flavours has thin slices of carrots and fish (don’t remember the name) in it. Good for the rainy season. Miso is fermented soybean paste and the ramen, though originated in China has undergone major upgradation in Japan. The Ramen had a slice of pork, cooked to perfection. Japanese use both the hands to eat ramen, they sip & eat at same time (incredible no?). The other elements of the dish were sriracha, peanut butter, soy sauce and lentils which lifted the flavours to a different levels.

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Suyigyo No Yakiniku

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Ebi Furai

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Suimono

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Miso Ramen

Before serving us the Sushi, Chef Amarjeet briefed us the history of how Sushi originated. So basically the food which was mostly rice & fish was stacked over each other with Nori paper inbetween and preserved for the difficult times. Also Sushi on contrary is not the regular food in Japan and served during the occassions only.

And then he unveiled the beautiful California Rolls with a twist. Instead of rice covering the fish, it was other way around. He admitted that this is not the original Japanese roll but invented in California – strange but delicious. Would have loved to try some more different kind of rolls but may be next time.

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California Rolls – just look at the detailing!!!

A good meal always end on a sweeter note, the chef presented most anticipated dessert of the day “Wasabi Panna Cotta”. The first look was promising, first bite exciting but then I could not understand the taste. I was expecting the explosion of hot & sweet but I guess Panna Cotta overpowered the heat of Wasabi. Nonetheless it was an innovative creation.

I loved the whole experience and would like to thank The BTeam & Mitali for the invite. A special thanks to Ms. Patrice Abrantes, Manager DoubleTree Hilton to bear the photography sessions with patience and more for the interesting conversations.  So people if you like to have some great authentic Japanese food, please do visit Miyuki and please make the reservations in advance.

The overall rating:

Ambience – 4.5/5

Food – 4.5/5

Service – 5/5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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